Par for the Course?: Exploring the Impacts of Incarceration and Marginalization on Poor Black Men in the U.S.

36 Pages Posted: 23 Jul 2014  

Nekima Levy-Pounds

Independent

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

African Americans represent 13% of the U.S. population, but represent nearly 40% of those who are incarcerated in local jails and state and federal prisons. Poor black men in particular are more susceptible to experiencing incarceration due to high rates of poverty, unemployment, marginalization, and exclusion from mainstream society. Additionally, laws and policies that comprise the war on drugs have fueled a tremendous growth in rates of incarceration for this segment of the population, with devastating consequences to boot for the children, families, and communities of those who are incarcerated. Further, this paper explores the links between the historical links between Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution and the current over-representation of African Americans within the criminal justice system. Finally, this paper examines disturbing trends in unemployment, poverty, and incarceration of African American men in Detroit, Michigan.

Keywords: race and the law, racial discrimination, incarceration, war on drugs, Thirteenth Amendment, race and justice, racial justice

Suggested Citation

Levy-Pounds, Nekima, Par for the Course?: Exploring the Impacts of Incarceration and Marginalization on Poor Black Men in the U.S. (2013). 14 Journal of Law and Society 29 (2013); U of St. Thomas (Minnesota) Legal Studies Research Paper No. 14-23. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2469986

Nekima Levy-Pounds (Contact Author)

Independent

No Address Available

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