Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes

Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology 5.2 (2011): 212-224

29 Pages Posted: 29 Jul 2014

See all articles by Abby Ershow

Abby Ershow

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Division of Cardiovascular Sciences

Charles B. Peterson

Government of the United States of America - Army

William Riley

Government of the United States of America - National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Albert Rizzo

University of Southern California - Institute for Creative Technologies

Brian Wansink

Retired

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive 3D stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This report summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health – Department of Defense workshop entitled “Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes.” The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Presentations and discussions addressed behavioral challenges related to diet, exercise, and diabetes management; the scientific basis of learning and treatment adherence; and recent advances in applications for health promotion and disease management. VR technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. VR also might be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR’s capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers with expertise in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites.

Keywords: irtual Reality, Obesity, Diabetes, Health Education, Simulation, Behavior

Suggested Citation

Ershow, Abby and Peterson, Charles B. and Riley, William and Rizzo, Albert and Wansink, Brian, Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes (2011). Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology 5.2 (2011): 212-224, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2473735

Abby Ershow (Contact Author)

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Division of Cardiovascular Sciences ( email )

73 Mr. Wayte Avenue
Bethesda, MD 01702
United States

Charles B. Peterson

Government of the United States of America - Army ( email )

United States Military Academy
United States

William Riley

Government of the United States of America - National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute ( email )

73 Mr. Wayte Avenue
Bethesda, MD 01702
United States

Albert Rizzo

University of Southern California - Institute for Creative Technologies ( email )

2250 Alcazar Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States
(310) 301-5018 (Phone)
(310) 574-5725 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://projects.ict.usc.edu/vrpsych

Brian Wansink

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

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