Dining in the Dark: The Importance of Visual Cues for Food Consumption and Satiety

Appetite 55.3 (2010): 710-713

4 Pages Posted: 31 Jul 2014

See all articles by Benjamin Scheibehenne

Benjamin Scheibehenne

University of Basel

Peter Todd

Max Planck Society for the Advancement of the Sciences - Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Brian Wansink

Retired

Date Written: August 8, 2010

Abstract

How important are visual cues for determining satiation? To find out, 64 participants were served lunch in a ‘‘dark’’ restaurant where they ate in complete darkness. Half the participants unknowingly received considerably larger ‘‘super-size’’ portions which subsequently led them to eat 36% more food. Despite this difference, participants’ appetite for dessert and their subjective satiety were largely unaffected by how much they had consumed. Consistent with expectations, participants were also less accurate in estimating their actual consumption quantity than a control group who ate the same meal in the light

Keywords: Food choice, Eating in the dark, Consumption quantity, Overeating, Visual cues

Suggested Citation

Scheibehenne, Benjamin and Todd, Peter and Wansink, Brian, Dining in the Dark: The Importance of Visual Cues for Food Consumption and Satiety (August 8, 2010). Appetite 55.3 (2010): 710-713, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2474272

Benjamin Scheibehenne

University of Basel ( email )

Petersplatz 1
Basel, CH-4003
Switzerland

Peter Todd

Max Planck Society for the Advancement of the Sciences - Max Planck Institute for Human Development ( email )

Lentzeallee 94
D-14195 Berlin, 14195
Germany

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

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