The Influence of Incidental Affect on Consumers’ Food Intake

Journal of Marketing 71.1 (2007): 194-206

13 Pages Posted: 1 Aug 2014

See all articles by Nitika Garg

Nitika Garg

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Brian Wansink

Cornell University

Jeffrey Inman

University of Pittsburgh - Katz Graduate School of Business

Date Written: January 1, 2007

Abstract

Although incidental affect has been shown to influence both attitude and purchase behavior, it has not been extended to actual consumption. This research investigates whether specific affective states influence food consumption and whether this influence is moderated by factors such as information and the nature of the product (hedonic versus less hedonic). The authors show that an integrative mood management and mood valuation framework accounts for this relationship more effectively than a self-regulation explanation. A preliminary test and two lab studies show that people eat larger amounts of hedonic foods (buttered popcorn and M&M’s) when they are in a sad state than when they are in a happy state and that this effect is attenuated when nutritional information is present. In contrast, they tend to eat larger amounts of a less hedonic product (raisins) when they are in a happy state than when they are in a sad state. The authors discuss implications for responsible marketers, health professionals, and health conscious consumers in the context of campaigns and individual efforts.

Suggested Citation

Garg, Nitika and Wansink, Brian and Inman, Jeffrey, The Influence of Incidental Affect on Consumers’ Food Intake (January 1, 2007). Journal of Marketing 71.1 (2007): 194-206. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2474319

Nitika Garg

University of New South Wales (UNSW) ( email )

Kensington
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Jeffrey Inman

University of Pittsburgh - Katz Graduate School of Business ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15260
United States

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