Terrorism and Targeted Killings in International Law

RESEARCH HANDBOOK ON INTERNATIONAL LAW AND TERRORISM, Ben Saul, ed., Edward Elgar, UK, pp. 250-270, 2014

Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 14/68

22 Pages Posted: 1 Aug 2014 Last revised: 4 Aug 2014

See all articles by Emily Crawford

Emily Crawford

University of Sydney - Faculty of Law

Date Written: July 30, 2014

Abstract

Targeted killing has become part of the conventional military and security strategy of a number of states in their operations against terrorist suspects, with Israel, the US and Russia among the most notable that have openly employed such tactics. Controversy has arisen regarding whether, as the perpetrator states have asserted, such killings should be considered as part of an ongoing ‘war’ against terrorist organizations, thus judged according to the law on the use of force (jus ad bellum) and the law of armed conflict (jus in bello or international humanitarian law (IHL), or whether the struggle against terrorist groups should be considered within a law enforcement framework, thus engaging international human rights law (IHRL). This chapter examines these issues.

Keywords: targeted killing, international humanitarian law, international human rights law, law of the use of force, direct participation in hostilities

JEL Classification: K10, K30, K33

Suggested Citation

Crawford, Emily, Terrorism and Targeted Killings in International Law (July 30, 2014). RESEARCH HANDBOOK ON INTERNATIONAL LAW AND TERRORISM, Ben Saul, ed., Edward Elgar, UK, pp. 250-270, 2014; Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 14/68. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2474444

Emily Crawford (Contact Author)

University of Sydney - Faculty of Law ( email )

University of Sydney
Sydney, NC NSW 2006
Australia

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