Antecedents and Mediators of Eating Bouts

Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 23.2 (1994): 166-182

28 Pages Posted: 2 Aug 2014

Date Written: December 1, 1994

Abstract

Understanding eating bouts is both theoretical and practical importance. Two questions are examined here: 1) What stimulates eating bouts? and 2) What influences how much food will be consumed during such a bout? The results from a survey of 178 adults suggest that eating episodes that involve 3 times as much of a particular food as that person would typically consume during that time period are considered by most people to constitute an "eating bout." These eating bouts can be stimulated by internal cues (such as moods or cravings) or by external cues (such as the visual salience of the food). In general, eating bouts that are stimulated by internal cues are perceived as being less reasonable, less healthy, less enjoyable, and they leave a person feeling more guilty, lonely, and depressed. Furthermore, it was found that when an eating bout is stimulated by external cues, the food's nutritional value, versatility, and perishability will influence how much he or she eats. in contrast, when an eating bout is stimulated by internal cues, these factors will not influence how much is eaten. The educational implications of these findings are then discussed.

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian, Antecedents and Mediators of Eating Bouts (December 1, 1994). Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 23.2 (1994): 166-182, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2474810

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

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