From ‘Winners and Losers’ to New Authority Structures in Ecological Policy

4(1) Human Ecology Review 49 (1997)

SUNY Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1997-100

4 Pages Posted: 8 Aug 2014 Last revised: 9 Aug 2014

See all articles by Errol Meidinger

Errol Meidinger

University at Buffalo Law School

Date Written: 1997

Abstract

This comment on a series of conference papers describes the extreme difficulty of accurately measuring costs and benefits of ecological policies and connecting them to specific social groups. It also explores the implications of three key characteristics of modern ecological scholarship: (1) it treats ecological authority as considerably more concentrated than it in fact is; (2) it labors under a very limited ability to analyze the cumulative effects of systems of rules, and (3) it manifests a near-crippling lack of attention to the policy roles of non-governmental, non-market international organizations. Accordingly, this comment stresses three pressing tasks for research and analysis: (1) developing a stronger capacity to analyze the cumulative effects of rules; (2) integrating, streamlining, or harmonizing federal environmental laws; and (3) systematic research on transnational non-governmental policy-making processes.

Keywords: Ecological policy, Ecological Authority, Federal Environmental Laws, Third Stream Institutions, Interagency Task Force on Ecosystem Management, governance, governance institutions

Suggested Citation

Meidinger, Errol, From ‘Winners and Losers’ to New Authority Structures in Ecological Policy (1997). 4(1) Human Ecology Review 49 (1997), SUNY Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1997-100, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2477134

Errol Meidinger (Contact Author)

University at Buffalo Law School ( email )

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