Volatility Spillovers from Australia's Major Trading Partners Across the GFC

25 Pages Posted: 16 Aug 2014

See all articles by David E. Allen

David E. Allen

School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sydney; Financial Research Network (FIRN); Department of Finance; School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University

Michael McAleer

Erasmus University Rotterdam - Erasmus School of Economics, Econometric Institute; Tinbergen Institute; University of Tokyo - Centre for International Research on the Japanese Economy (CIRJE), Faculty of Economics

Robert J. Powell

Edith Cowan University - School of Accounting, Finance and Economics; Financial Research Network (FIRN)

Abhay Kumar-Singh

Edith Cowan University

Date Written: August 13, 2014

Abstract

This paper features an analysis of volatility spillover effects from Australia's major trading partners, namely, China, Japan, Korea and the United States, for a period running from 1st January 2004 to 30th June 2014. This captures the impact of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC). These markets are represented by the following major indices: The Shanghai composite and the Hangseng. (in the case of China, as both China and Hong Kong appear in Australian trade statistics), the S&P500 index, the Nikkei225 and the Kospi index. We apply the Diebold and Yilmaz (2009) Spillover Index, constructed in a VAR framework, to assess spillovers across these markets in returns and in volatilities. The analysis confirms that the US and Hong Kong markets have the greatest influence on the Australian one. We then move to a GARCH framework to apply further analysis and apply a tri-variate Cholesky-GARCH model to explore the effects from the US and Chinese market, as represented by the Hang Seng Index.

Keywords: Volatility Spillover Index, VAR analysis, Variance Decomposition, Cholesky-GARCH

Suggested Citation

Allen, David Edmund and McAleer, Michael and Powell, Robert J. and Kumar-Singh, Abhay, Volatility Spillovers from Australia's Major Trading Partners Across the GFC (August 13, 2014). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2479841 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2479841

David Edmund Allen (Contact Author)

School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sydney ( email )

School of Mathematics and Statistics F07
University of Sydney
Sydney, New South Wales 2006
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.maths.usyd.edu.au

Financial Research Network (FIRN)

C/- University of Queensland Business School
St Lucia, 4071 Brisbane
Queensland
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.firn.org.au

Department of Finance ( email )

Taiwan
Taiwan

School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University

100 Joondalup Drive
Joondalup, WA 6027
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.dallenwapty.com

Michael McAleer

Erasmus University Rotterdam - Erasmus School of Economics, Econometric Institute ( email )

Rotterdam
Netherlands

Tinbergen Institute

Rotterdam
Netherlands

University of Tokyo - Centre for International Research on the Japanese Economy (CIRJE), Faculty of Economics

Tokyo
Japan

Robert J. Powell

Edith Cowan University - School of Accounting, Finance and Economics ( email )

Joondalup Campus
Perth
Joondalup 6027, WA
Australia

Financial Research Network (FIRN)

C/- University of Queensland Business School
St Lucia, 4071 Brisbane
Queensland
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.firn.org.au

Abhay Kumar-Singh

Edith Cowan University ( email )

Mount Lawley Campus
Perth
Churchlands 6018 WA, Victoria
Australia

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