Freedom of Expression in Post-Soviet Russia (Contribution to the Symposium Building BRICS: Human Rights in Today's Emerging Economic Powers)

30 Pages Posted: 19 Aug 2014 Last revised: 6 Nov 2014

See all articles by Jeffrey Kahn

Jeffrey Kahn

Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law

Date Written: February 15, 2013

Abstract

This Article assesses the freedom of expression in Russia and prospects for its future: what has the Russian state promised its citizens, in what legal forms have those promises been made, and how well are those paper promises being kept in practice? The Article considers recent state actions and statutes enacted to regulate speech, association, and other forms of expression, and determines that these are possible because of the very weak separation of powers in the Russian Federation. The Article concludes by looking at the European Convention on Human Rights as one hope for a power capable of exerting influence on Russian practices, although it exists outside of Russia. Judgments of the European Court of Human Rights established under the Convention present a roadmap for future reform according to standards that Russia has already agreed to accept.

Keywords: Russia, freedom of expression, speech, association, separation of powers, European Convention on Human Rights

Suggested Citation

Kahn, Jeffrey, Freedom of Expression in Post-Soviet Russia (Contribution to the Symposium Building BRICS: Human Rights in Today's Emerging Economic Powers) (February 15, 2013). UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs, Vol. 18, 2013; SMU Dedman School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 149. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2481050

Jeffrey Kahn (Contact Author)

Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 750116
Dallas, TX 75275
United States
(214) 768-2792 (Phone)
(214) 768-4330 (Fax)

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