When Is It Efficient to Treat Juvenile Offenders More Leniently than Adult Offenders?

33 Pages Posted: 31 Aug 2014 Last revised: 4 Mar 2015

See all articles by Derek Pyne

Derek Pyne

Thompson Rivers University - School of Business and Economics

Date Written: August 15, 2014

Abstract

This paper provides a rationale for two characteristics of juvenile justice systems. First, juvenile justice systems tend to be more lenient in terms of both incarceration rates and time incarcerated. Second, higher expenditures are made to incarcerate a juvenile offender than an adult prisoner. It does this by examining the effect juvenile incarceration has on human capital acquisition and in turn, later incentives to commit crime as adults. In the process, it also offers an explanation of the empirical finding that individuals arrested as juveniles are more likely to be arrested as adults.

Keywords: Juvenile crime, Young offenders, Incarceration

JEL Classification: K14, K42

Suggested Citation

Pyne, Derek, When Is It Efficient to Treat Juvenile Offenders More Leniently than Adult Offenders? (August 15, 2014). Economics of Governance, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2481269

Derek Pyne (Contact Author)

Thompson Rivers University - School of Business and Economics ( email )

900 McGill Road
Kamloops, British Columbia V2C 0C8
Canada

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