Neuroimagery and the Jury

The Jury Expert, Vol. 26, Issue 1 (2014)

5 Pages Posted: 21 Aug 2014

See all articles by Jillian Ware

Jillian Ware

Arizona State University (ASU)

Jessica Jones

Arizona State University (ASU)

N. J. Schweitzer

Arizona State University

Date Written: August 20, 2014

Abstract

Technological advances in the field of neuroscience have raised concerns in both the academic and legal communities pertaining to how people evaluate this type of evidence. Neuroimages, such as those produced by MRI and fMRI scanners, provide sophisticated, tangible representations of otherwise complex and abstract physiological processes; as such, inexpert viewers may find this type of visual aid particularly alluring when offered as support for a particular scientific claim. It was thus feared that the public, including jurors, may find neuroimages to be particularly persuasive forms of evidence, thereby impeding their ability to make unbiased decisions.

Keywords: Law, Psychology, Neuroscience, Evidence

Suggested Citation

Ware, Jillian and Jones, Jessica and Schweitzer, Nicholas J., Neuroimagery and the Jury (August 20, 2014). The Jury Expert, Vol. 26, Issue 1 (2014), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2483962

Jillian Ware

Arizona State University (ASU) ( email )

Farmer Building 440G PO Box 872011
Tempe, AZ 85287
United States

Jessica Jones

Arizona State University (ASU) ( email )

Farmer Building 440G PO Box 872011
Tempe, AZ 85287
United States

Nicholas J. Schweitzer (Contact Author)

Arizona State University ( email )

PO BOX 37100
Phoenix, AZ 85069-7100
United States

HOME PAGE: http://lsprg.asu.edu

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