Can Market-Based Approaches to Technology Development and Dissemination Benefit Women Smallholder Farmers? A Qualitative Assessment of Gender Dynamics in the Ownership, Purchase, and Use of Irrigation Pumps in Kenya and Tanzania

36 Pages Posted: 22 Aug 2014

See all articles by Jemimah Njuki

Jemimah Njuki

Cultivate Africa’s Future

Elizabeth Waithanji

International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi

Beatrice Sakwa

KickStart International

Juliet Kariuki

University of Hohenheim

Elizabeth Mukewa

University of Minnesota - Minneapolis

John Ngige

KickStart International

Date Written: July 11, 2014

Abstract

Rural household economies dependent on rainfed agriculture are increasingly turning to irrigation technology solutions to reduce the effects of weather variability and guard against inconsistent and low crop output. Organizations are increasingly using market-based approaches to disseminate technologies to smallholder farmers, and, although women are among their targeted group, little is known of the extent to which these approaches are reaching and benefiting women. There is also little evidence on the implications of women’s use and control of irrigation technologies for outcomes, including crop choice and income management. This paper reports findings from a qualitative study undertaken in Tanzania and Kenya to examine women’s access to and ownership of KickStart pumps and the implications for their ability to make major decisions on crop choices and use of income from irrigated crops. Results from sales-monitoring data show that women purchase less than 10 percent of the pumps and men continue to make most of the major decisions on crop choices and income use. These findings vary by type of crop, with men making major decisions on high-income crops such as tomatoes and women having relatively more autonomy on crops such as leafy vegetables. The study concludes that market-based approaches on their own cannot guarantee access to and ownership of technologies, and businesses need to take specific measures toward the goal of reaching and benefiting women.

Keywords: Gender, household decisionmaking, income management, irrigation technology, market approaches

Suggested Citation

Njuki, Jemimah and Waithanji, Elizabeth and Sakwa, Beatrice and Kariuki, Juliet and Mukewa, Elizabeth and Ngige, John, Can Market-Based Approaches to Technology Development and Dissemination Benefit Women Smallholder Farmers? A Qualitative Assessment of Gender Dynamics in the Ownership, Purchase, and Use of Irrigation Pumps in Kenya and Tanzania (July 11, 2014). IFPRI Discussion Paper 01357, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2483975 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2483975

Jemimah Njuki (Contact Author)

Cultivate Africa’s Future ( email )

P.O. Box 5689
Ababa
Kenya

Elizabeth Waithanji

International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi ( email )

P.O. Box 5689
Ababa
Kenya

Beatrice Sakwa

KickStart International ( email )

c/o Sandbox Suites, 567 Sutter St, 3rd Floor
San Francisco, CA Nairobi 94102
Kenya

Juliet Kariuki

University of Hohenheim ( email )

Fruwirthstr. 48
Stuttgart, 70599
Germany

Elizabeth Mukewa

University of Minnesota - Minneapolis ( email )

110 Wulling Hall, 86 Pleasant St, S.E.
308 Harvard Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

John Ngige

KickStart International ( email )

c/o Sandbox Suites, 567 Sutter St, 3rd Floor
San Francisco, CA Nairobi 94102
Kenya

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