Gender, Justice and the Left Hand of God: A Lutheran Perspective

Southern Calif. Review of Law & Women's Studies, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1999

Posted: 15 Jan 2001  

Marie A. Failinger

Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Abstract

Contrary to the conservative practice of many Lutheran churches, this article suggests that Lutheran theology offers a much more dynamic, albeit complex, view of gender. Like much feminist, many mainstream Lutheran theological views of justice are contextual, focussed on human experience, non-essentialist, and skeptical of reason and power. Focussing on the paradox that human beings are good creations of and co-creators with God, and thoroughly sinful at the very same time, Lutherans also search for self-justification of privilege, but train a critical eye upon oppressed groups as well as oppressors. Understanding that God's revelation is hidden from human beings except in the Gospel and that God continues to create within history, some Lutherans have viewed gender as a complex and changing givenness which both implies and denies human freedom, rejecting rigid naturalism for a more complicated view of human reality.

Suggested Citation

Failinger, Marie A., Gender, Justice and the Left Hand of God: A Lutheran Perspective. Southern Calif. Review of Law & Women's Studies, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1999. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=248576

Marie A. Failinger (Contact Author)

Mitchell Hamline School of Law ( email )

875 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105-3076
United States

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