Agricultural Production, Dietary Diversity, and Climate Variability

41 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016 Last revised: 2 Jun 2020

See all articles by Andrew Dillon

Andrew Dillon

Michigan State University

Kevin McGee

American University

Gbemisola Oseni

World Bank

Kevin Robert Mcgee

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Gbemisola Oseni Siwatu

World Bank

Date Written: September 1, 2014

Abstract

Nonseparable household models outline the links between agricultural production and household consumption, yet empirical extensions to investigate the effect of production on dietary diversity and diet composition are limited. Although a significant literature has investigated the calorie-income elasticity abstracting from production, this paper provides an empirical application of the nonseparable household model linking the effect of exogenous variation in planting season production decisions via climate variability on household dietary diversity. Using exogenous variation in degree days, rainfall, and agricultural capital stocks as instruments, the effect of production on household dietary diversity at harvest is estimated. The empirical specifications estimate production effects on dietary diversity using both agricultural revenue and crop production diversity. Significant effects of agricultural revenue and crop production diversity on dietary diversity are estimated. The dietary diversity-production elasticities imply that a 10 percent increase in agricultural revenue or crop diversity results in a 1.8 percent or 2.4 percent increase in dietary diversity, respectively. These results illustrate that agricultural income growth or increased crop diversity may not be sufficient to ensure improved dietary diversity. Increases in agricultural revenue do change diet composition. Estimates of the effect of agricultural income on share of calories by food groups indicate relatively large changes in diet composition. On average, a 10 percent increase in agricultural revenue makes households 7.2 percent more likely to consume vegetables and 3.5 percent more likely to consume fish, and increases the share of tubers consumed by 5.2 percent.

Keywords: Nutrition, Crops and Crop Management Systems, Climate Change and Agriculture, Food Security, Health Care Services Industry, Climate Change and Environment, Climate Change and Health, Science of Climate Change

Suggested Citation

Dillon, Andrew and McGee, Kevin and Oseni, Gbemisola and Mcgee, Kevin Robert and Siwatu, Gbemisola Oseni, Agricultural Production, Dietary Diversity, and Climate Variability (September 1, 2014). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 7022, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2491935

Andrew Dillon

Michigan State University ( email )

Agriculture Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824-1122
United States

Kevin McGee

American University

4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20016
United States

Gbemisola Oseni

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Kevin Robert Mcgee

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Gbemisola Oseni Siwatu

World Bank

1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

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