Long Workweeks and Strange Hours

16 Pages Posted: 8 Sep 2014 Last revised: 17 Nov 2021

See all articles by Daniel S. Hamermesh

Daniel S. Hamermesh

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Elena Stancanelli

Paris School of Economics (PSE)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: September 2014

Abstract

American workweeks are long compared to other rich countries'. Much less well-known is that Americans are more likely to work at night and on weekends. We examine the relationship between these two phenomena using the American Time Use Survey and time-diary data from 5 other countries. Adjusting for demographic differences, Americans' incidence of night and weekend work would drop by about 10 percent if European workweeks prevailed. Even if no Americans worked long hours, the incidence of unusual work times in the U.S. would far exceed those in continental Europe.

Suggested Citation

Hamermesh, Daniel S. and Stancanelli, Elena, Long Workweeks and Strange Hours (September 2014). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2492961

Daniel S. Hamermesh (Contact Author)

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Economics ( email )

Austin, TX 78712
United States
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512-471-3510 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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Elena Stancanelli

Paris School of Economics (PSE) ( email )

48 Boulevard Jourdan
Paris, 75014 75014
France

HOME PAGE: http://www.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/fr/stancanelli-elena/

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