How Come I'm Allowing Strangers to Go Through My Phone? Smartphones and Privacy Expectations.

14 Pages Posted: 10 Sep 2014

See all articles by Jennifer King

Jennifer King

Center for Internet and Society, Stanford Law School; University of California, Berkeley - School of Information

Date Written: March 15, 2012

Abstract

This study examines the privacy expectations of smart phone users by exploring two specific dimensions to smart phone privacy: participants’ concerns with other people accessing the personal data stored on their smart phones, and applications accessing this data via platform APIs. We interviewed 24 Apple iPhone and Google Android users about their smart phone usage, using Altman’s theory of boundary regulation and Nissenbaum’s theory of contextual integrity to shape our inquiry. We found these theories provided a strong rationale for explaining participants’ privacy expectations, but there were discrepancies between users’ privacy expectations, smart phone usage, and the current information access practices by application developers. We conclude by exploring this “privacy gap” and recommending design improvements to both the platforms and applications to address it.

Keywords: smartphones, privacy, privacy expectations, mental models, applications, apps, iPhone, iOS, Android

Suggested Citation

King, Jennifer, How Come I'm Allowing Strangers to Go Through My Phone? Smartphones and Privacy Expectations. (March 15, 2012). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2493412 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2493412

Jennifer King (Contact Author)

Center for Internet and Society, Stanford Law School ( email )

559 Nathan Abbott Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States

HOME PAGE: http://https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/about/people/jen-king

University of California, Berkeley - School of Information ( email )

102 South Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States

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