The Resurgence of Lay Adjudicatory Systems in East Asia

12 Asian Pacific Law and Policy Journal 1 (2010)

11 Pages Posted: 12 Sep 2014

See all articles by Hiroshi Fukurai

Hiroshi Fukurai

University of California Santa Cruz

Kay-Wah Chan

Macquarie University

Setsuo Miyazawa

Aoyama Gakuin University

Date Written: April 1, 2010

Abstract

A new historic stage has clearly begun. The Asian neo-colonies under U.S. military jurisdiction are finding an independent legal path to protect their citizens from abuse. And on May 27, 2010, the movement at last was launched with the Japanese citizen’s lay court in Okinawa, finding the U.S. soldier guilty of robbery and bodily injuries to a cab driver and sentencing him to three to four years in a Japanese prison.

There will be more American military defendants subject to this judicial process, as lay adjudication begins to play an important role in placing the burden of responsibility on military personnel’s activities -- functioning as effective judicial oversight of the actions and conduct of American military personnel in Okinawa and other parts of the world still hosting substantial U.S. military installations.

Suggested Citation

Fukurai, Hiroshi and Chan, Kay-Wah and Miyazawa, Setsuo, The Resurgence of Lay Adjudicatory Systems in East Asia (April 1, 2010). 12 Asian Pacific Law and Policy Journal 1 (2010) , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2494862

Hiroshi Fukurai (Contact Author)

University of California Santa Cruz ( email )

1156 High St
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
United States
831-459-2971 (Phone)
831-459-3518 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://people.ucsc.edu/~hfukurai/

Kay-Wah Chan

Macquarie University ( email )

North Ryde
Sydney, New South Wales 2109
Australia

Setsuo Miyazawa

Aoyama Gakuin University ( email )

4-4-25 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku
Tokyo, 150-8366
Japan

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