Do Star Performers Produce More Stars? Peer Effects and Learning in Elite Teams

54 Pages Posted: 15 Sep 2014

See all articles by Thomas Juster

Thomas Juster

University of Oxford

Anne Preston

Haverford College - Department of Economics

Date Written: September 2014

Abstract

This study investigates the professional soccer industry to ask whether the talent of an individual's co-workers helps explain differences in the rate of human capital accumulation on the job. Data tracking national soccer team performance and the professional leagues their members play for are particularly well suited for developing convincing non-experimental evidence about these kinds of peer effects. The empirical results consistently show that performance improves more after an individual has been a member of an elite team than when he has been a member of lower level teams. The conclusion is borne out by a rich set of complementary data on: national team performance, player-level performance, performance of foreign players who joined elite teams after an exogenous shift in the number of foreign players participating on top club teams, performance of players on national teams in the year just before and the year just after they join an elite club team, and experiences of several national team players obtained through personal interviews.

Suggested Citation

Juster, Thomas and Preston, Anne, Do Star Performers Produce More Stars? Peer Effects and Learning in Elite Teams (September 2014). NBER Working Paper No. w20478. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2496235

Thomas Juster (Contact Author)

University of Oxford

Anne Preston

Haverford College - Department of Economics ( email )

Haverford, PA 19041
United States

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