Safety Organizing, Emotional Exhaustion, and Turnover in Hospital Nursing Units

8 Pages Posted: 18 Sep 2014 Last revised: 12 Mar 2015

See all articles by Timothy J. Vogus

Timothy J. Vogus

Vanderbilt University - Organizational Behavior

Bruce Cooil

Vanderbilt University - Statistics

Mary Sitterding

Independent

Linda Everett

Independent

Date Written: September 16, 2014

Abstract

Context: Prior research has found that safety organizing behaviors of registered nurses (RNs) positively impact patient safety. However, little research exists on how engaging in safety organizing affects caregivers.

Objectives: While we know that organizational processes can have divergent effects on organizational and employee outcomes, little research exists on the effects of pursuing highly reliable performance through safety organizing on caregivers. Specifically, we examined whether, and the conditions under which, safety organizing affects RN emotional exhaustion and nursing unit turnover rates.

Subjects: Subjects included 1352 RNs in 50 intensive care, internal medicine, labor, and surgery nursing units in 3 Midwestern acutecare hospitals who completed questionnaires between August and December 2011 and 50 Nurse Managers from the units who completed questionnaires in December 2012.

Research Design: Cross-sectional analyses of RN emotional exhaustion linked to survey data on safety organizing and hospital incident reporting system data on adverse event rates for the year before survey administration. Cross-sectional analysis of unit-level RN turnover rates for the year following the administration of the survey linked to survey data on safety organizing.

Results: Multilevel regression analysis indicated that safety organizing was negatively associated with RN emotional exhaustion on units with higher rates of adverse events and positively associated with RN emotional exhaustion with lower rates of adverse events. Tobit regression analyses indicated that safety organizing was associated with lower unit level of turnover rates over time.

Conclusions: Safety organizing is beneficial to caregivers in multiple ways, especially on nursing units with high levels of adverse events and over time.

Keywords: safety organizing, mindfulness, emotional exhaustion, turnover, high reliability, adverse events

Suggested Citation

Vogus, Timothy J. and Cooil, Bruce and Sitterding, Mary and Everett, Linda, Safety Organizing, Emotional Exhaustion, and Turnover in Hospital Nursing Units (September 16, 2014). Medical Care, 52(10): 870-876, 2014; Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management Research Paper No. 2497220. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2497220

Timothy J. Vogus (Contact Author)

Vanderbilt University - Organizational Behavior ( email )

Nashville, TN 37203
United States

Bruce Cooil

Vanderbilt University - Statistics ( email )

Nashville, TN 37203
United States

Mary Sitterding

Independent ( email )

Linda Everett

Independent ( email )

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