Questioning the End Effect: Endings Are Not Inherently Over-Weighted in Retrospective Evaluations of Experiences

Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145 (May), 630-642.

13 Pages Posted: 21 Sep 2014 Last revised: 16 Sep 2019

See all articles by Stephanie Tully

Stephanie Tully

Stanford University

Tom Meyvis

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

Date Written: 2016

Abstract

The present research re-examines one of the most basic assertions regarding the evaluation of hedonic experiences: the end effect. The end effect suggests that the retrospective evaluation of an experience is disproportionately influenced by the final moments of the experience. The findings in this paper indicate that endings are not inherently over-weighted in retrospective evaluations. That is, episodes do not disproportionately affect the evaluation of an experience simply because they occur at the end. We replicate findings that are consistent with the end effect, but provide additional evidence implicating other processes as driving factors of those findings.

Keywords: hedonic experiences, evaluation, peak-end rule, perception, satisfaction

JEL Classification: C91, M31

Suggested Citation

Tully, Stephanie and Meyvis, Tom, Questioning the End Effect: Endings Are Not Inherently Over-Weighted in Retrospective Evaluations of Experiences (2016). Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145 (May), 630-642., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2498663 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2498663

Stephanie Tully (Contact Author)

Stanford University ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Tom Meyvis

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

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