The Bond Market: An Inflation-Targeter&Apos;S Best Friend

26 Pages Posted: 22 Sep 2014 Last revised: 2 Jul 2021

See all articles by Andrew Kenan Rose

Andrew Kenan Rose

University of California - Haas School of Business; NUS Business School; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

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Date Written: September 2014

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between inflation and the existence of a publicly-traded, long-maturity, nominal, domestic-currency bond market. Bond holders suffer from inflation and could be a potent anti-inflationary force; I ask whether their presence is apparent empirically. I use a panel data approach, examining the difference in inflation before and after the introduction of a bond market. My primary focus is on countries with inflation targeting regimes, though I also examine countries with hard fixed exchange rates and other monetary regimes. Inflation-targeting countries with a bond market experience inflation approximately three to four percentage points lower than those without a bond market. This effect is economically and statistically significant; it is also insensitive to a variety of estimation strategies, including using political and fiscal instrumental variables. The existence of a bond market has little effect on inflation in other monetary regimes, as do indexed or foreign-denominated bonds.

Suggested Citation

Rose, Andrew Kenan, The Bond Market: An Inflation-Targeter&Apos;S Best Friend (September 2014). NBER Working Paper No. w20494, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2499336

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