From Comparison to Collaboration: Experiments with a New Scholarly and Political Form

38 Pages Posted: 28 Sep 2014 Last revised: 25 Oct 2016

Annelise Riles

Cornell University - Law School

Date Written: September 26, 2014

Abstract

In both the anthropology of law and comparative legal studies, a new direction for research and practice is emerging: collaboration. This article analyzes collaboration as a modality of comparative law and legal anthropology and indeed a wider template for social and political life at this moment. I consider the theoretical and practical reasons for its importance at this moment, and its implications for the relationship of comparative law and legal anthropology. I argue that the very ubiquity and mundanity of collaboration discourse and practice in law and policy suggests that a response cannot simply be critique from outside — it must entail doing something with and within this template. I work through these claims through the example of a transnational and transdisciplinary collaborative intellectual project I am directing, known as Meridian 180.

Keywords: comparative law, legal anthropology, collaboration, comparison

Suggested Citation

Riles, Annelise, From Comparison to Collaboration: Experiments with a New Scholarly and Political Form (September 26, 2014). Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 77, Forthcoming; Cornell Legal Studies Research Paper No. 14-35. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2502126

Annelise Riles (Contact Author)

Cornell University - Law School ( email )

Myron Taylor Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853-4901
United States

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