Empirical Research on the Core Competencies Needed to Practice Law: What Do Clients, New Lawyers, and Legal Employers Tell Us?

12 Pages Posted: 30 Sep 2014

See all articles by Neil W. Hamilton

Neil W. Hamilton

University of St. Thomas School of Law (Minnesota)

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

Key stakeholders in legal services, legal education, and the professional regulation of lawyers are asking the following question: What are the core competencies needed for a new lawyer to practice law effectively and successfully? Since the focus of professions like law, medicine, the clergy, and the professorate is to provide assistance at a high level of commitment and professional competence to the person served (client, patient, parishioner, and student), a good place to start in answering this question would be to examine empirical research on what core competencies are needed by the person served. This article summarizes some of the empirical data available to answer this question.

Keywords: legal education, professional formation, professionalism, professional regulation, professional responsibility

Suggested Citation

Hamilton, Neil W., Empirical Research on the Core Competencies Needed to Practice Law: What Do Clients, New Lawyers, and Legal Employers Tell Us? (2014). The Bar Examiner, September 2014; U of St. Thomas (Minnesota) Legal Studies Research Paper No. 14-34. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2502924

Neil W. Hamilton (Contact Author)

University of St. Thomas School of Law (Minnesota) ( email )

MSL 400, 1000 La Salle Avenue
Minneapolis, MN Minnesota 55403-2005
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
729
rank
33,109
Abstract Views
1,616
PlumX Metrics