The World of Intellectual Property and the Decision to Arbitrate

19 ARBITRATION INTERNATIONAL 441-449 (2003)

11 Pages Posted: 7 Oct 2014

See all articles by David D. Caron

David D. Caron

King's College London – The Dickson Poon School of Law (deceased); University of California, Berkeley, School of Law (deceased)

Date Written: October 6, 2014

Abstract

At least a decade ago, a discussion began in earnest about international arbitration of intellectual property (‘IP’) disputes. Certainly, this discussion was ongoing before then, but the topic took on added significance as the number of transactions involving IP increased dramatically. IP represented a big sector of industry, and arbitration institutions and specialists were asking how arbitration might become part of this growing sector as it had become a part of other sectors.

At that time, there were at least two perceptions about the IP sector and the arbitration of IP disputes. First, the IP sector preferred litigation to arbitration of its disputes. Secondly, the concerns of the IP sector turned on the assertion that IP disputes were fundamentally different from other disputes and that such differences were not particularly well served by the institutions of arbitration. What has followed is a decade-long effort by the arbitration community to address the special nature of IP disputes. Despite that decade of effort, it appears the IP world remains hesitant to choose arbitration. This article attempts to explain why this is the case.

Suggested Citation

Caron, David D., The World of Intellectual Property and the Decision to Arbitrate (October 6, 2014). 19 ARBITRATION INTERNATIONAL 441-449 (2003), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2506120

David D. Caron (Contact Author)

King's College London – The Dickson Poon School of Law (deceased)

University of California, Berkeley, School of Law (deceased)

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