A Theory of Innovation: Benefit, Harm, and Legal Regimes

Edgell, Robert A. & Vogl, R. (2013). A theory of innovation: Benefit, harm, and legal regimes. Law, Innovation and Technology, 5(1), 21-53

33 Pages Posted: 8 Oct 2014

See all articles by Robert Edgell

Robert Edgell

SUNY Polytechnic Institute; University of St. Gallen; Columbia University - Columbia Business School

Roland Vogl

Stanford Law School

Date Written: November 1, 2013

Abstract

Given contextual pressures, firms increasingly adopt formal and legitimized innovation strategies, managerial practices, techniques or useful processes to achieve successful innovation outcomes. While much innovation research has contributed to a greater understanding of the economic, social, and individual benefits derived from new technologies, there has been little significant discourse about potential harms that can arise from innovation. But as innovators and managers apply innovation models, what informational choices and responsibilities do they have? And perhaps more importantly, under which circumstances are innovating firms most likely to create harm? Building on existing management and legal literature, we use an interdisciplinary approach to develop a theory of innovation, harm, and information. We contribute detailed conceptions of harm and innovation as well as an information-centric typology for innovation models. Our paper delineates six (6) propositions that predict the internal and institutional conditions under which firms would make innovation and information decisions that lead to harmful or beneficial behavior paths and outcomes. Our paper sheds theoretical light on a previously underexplored area and suggests that the choice of innovation approach does matter, especially when considering consequences to firm-external constituents.

Keywords: Change; corporate governance; creativity; discourse; ethics; harm;, information asymmetries; innovation models; innovation; institutional theory; legal liability; separation thesis; social responsibility; transparency

Suggested Citation

Edgell, Robert and Vogl, Roland, A Theory of Innovation: Benefit, Harm, and Legal Regimes (November 1, 2013). Edgell, Robert A. & Vogl, R. (2013). A theory of innovation: Benefit, harm, and legal regimes. Law, Innovation and Technology, 5(1), 21-53. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2506360

Robert Edgell (Contact Author)

SUNY Polytechnic Institute ( email )

100 Seymour Road
Utica, NY NY 13502
United States

University of St. Gallen

Varnbuelstr. 14
Saint Gallen, St. Gallen CH-9000
Switzerland

Columbia University - Columbia Business School

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Roland Vogl

Stanford Law School ( email )

559 Nathan Abbott Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States

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