Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

Divide and Confound: The Strange Allocation of U.S. Regulatory Authority Over Food

Food and Drug Regulation in an Era of Globalized Markets, Elsevier, 2015

15 Pages Posted: 11 Oct 2014  

Lisa Heinzerling

Georgetown University Law Center

Date Written: October 8, 2014

Abstract

One of the great problems of the food system in the United States is its failure to understand and embody the unity of the health of the environment in which food is grown and the wholesomeness of the food itself. In law, no feature of the system better symbolizes this failure than the scattering of regulatory authority over the food supply across multiple federal agencies with multifarious missions. The fragmentation of authority leads to inefficiency and ineffectiveness in the pursuit of a safe food supply. It also promotes opacity and dissonance in messages about the nature and quality of our food. Moving regulatory authority over food into one body rather than many would not, however, remove the most basic obstacles to a safe and transparent food supply, and it could, counterproductively, convince us that a bureaucratic reshuffling is all we need to achieve wholesome and open food.

Keywords: food and drug law, food law, regulatory fragmentation, food safety, food transparency

Suggested Citation

Heinzerling, Lisa, Divide and Confound: The Strange Allocation of U.S. Regulatory Authority Over Food (October 8, 2014). Food and Drug Regulation in an Era of Globalized Markets, Elsevier, 2015. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2507346

Lisa Heinzerling (Contact Author)

Georgetown University Law Center ( email )

600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001
United States

Paper statistics

Downloads
162
Rank
154,055
Abstract Views
746