The Effect of Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status on Education and Health Outcomes for Children Living in Social Housing

American Journal of Public Health, Sept. 2014

11 Pages Posted: 16 Oct 2014 Last revised: 17 Oct 2014

See all articles by Patricia Martens

Patricia Martens

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Dan Chateau

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Elaine Burland

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Gregory Finlayson

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Mark Smith

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Carole Taylor

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Marni D. Brownell

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Nathan Nickel

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Alan Katz

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

James Bolton

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS); University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

Date Written: September 1, 2014

Abstract

Objectives: We explored differences in health and education outcomes between children living in social housing and not, and effects of social housing’s neighborhood socioeconomic status.

Methods: In this cohort study, we used the population-based repository of administrative data at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. We included children aged 0 to 19 years in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in fiscal years 2006-2007 to 2008-2009 (n = 13 238 social housing; n = 174 017 others). We examined 5 outcomes: age-2 complete immunization, a school-readiness measure, adolescent pregnancy (ages 15-19 years), grade-9 completion, and high-school completion. Logistic regression and generalized estimating equation modeling generated rates. We derived neighborhood income quintiles (Q1 lowest, Q5 highest) from average household income census data.

Results: Children in social housing fared worse than comparative children within each neighborhood income quintile. When we compared children in social housing by quintile, preschool indicators (immunization and school readiness) were similar, but adolescent outcomes (grade-9 and high-school completion, adolescent pregnancy) were better in Q3 to Q5.

Conclusions: Children in social housing had poorer health and education outcomes than all others, but living in social housing in wealthier areas was associated with better adolescent outcomes.

Suggested Citation

Martens, Patricia and Chateau, Dan and Burland, Elaine and Finlayson, Gregory and Smith, Mark and Taylor, Carole and Brownell, Marni D. and Nickel, Nathan and Katz, Alan and Bolton, James, The Effect of Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status on Education and Health Outcomes for Children Living in Social Housing (September 1, 2014). American Journal of Public Health, Sept. 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2510516

Patricia Martens (Contact Author)

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) ( email )

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Dan Chateau

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) ( email )

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Elaine Burland

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Gregory Finlayson

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Mark Smith

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) ( email )

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Carole Taylor

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Marni D. Brownell

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) ( email )

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Nathan Nickel

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) ( email )

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

Alan Katz

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) ( email )

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy ( email )

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

James Bolton

University of Manitoba - Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS)

750 Bannatyne Ave
Winnipeg, R3E 0W3
Canada

University of Manitoba - Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus
Winnipeg
Canada

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