Foreign and Native-Born Stem Graduates and Innovation Intensity in the United States

50 Pages Posted: 25 Oct 2014

See all articles by John V. Winters

John V. Winters

Iowa State University - Department of Economics

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of foreign- and native-born STEM graduates and non-STEM graduates on patent intensity in U.S. metropolitan areas. I find that both native and foreign-born STEM graduates significantly increase metropolitan area patent intensity, but college graduates in non-STEM fields have a smaller and statistically insignificant effect on patenting. These findings hold for both cross-sectional OLS and 2SLS regressions. I also use time-differenced 2SLS regressions to estimate the effects of STEM-driven increases in native and foreign college graduate shares and again find that both native and foreign STEM graduates have statistically significant and economically large effects on innovation. Together these results suggest that policies that increase the stocks of both foreign and native STEM graduates increase innovation and provide considerable economic benefits to regions and nations.

Keywords: STEM, innovation, patents, human capital, higher education

JEL Classification: I25, J24, J61, O31, R12

Suggested Citation

Winters, John V., Foreign and Native-Born Stem Graduates and Innovation Intensity in the United States. IZA Discussion Paper No. 8575. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2514768

John V. Winters (Contact Author)

Iowa State University - Department of Economics ( email )

260 Heady Hall
Ames, IA 50011
United States

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