Where Have All the Good Doctors Gone? Testing Theories of Spatial Sorting Using Medical School Rank of Medical Doctors in California

26 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2014 Last revised: 27 Nov 2017

See all articles by Stephen Popick

Stephen Popick

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Date Written: November 25, 2017

Abstract

Recent research suggests multiple causes for the spatial variation of human capital observed both among and within cities. This paper studies the location choice of medical doctors in the same industry, specialty, and state, measuring a doctor's human capital through their medical school's rank. The empirical design allows for testing the relation between spatial variation in real estate costs and human capital in isolation from other plausible causes. Empirical results strongly suggest there is a pure human capital effect of real estate costs that is independent of other theories identified in the literature. Further, the findings are consistent Robackā€˜s(1988) hypothesis that real estate costs have different effects on workers with different human capital.

Note: The analysis, conclusions, and opinions set forth here are those of the author alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or George Washington University.

Keywords: human capital, externality, skill intensity, Rosen-Roback, income elasticity, returns to skill

JEL Classification: J24, R12, R13

Suggested Citation

Popick, Stephen, Where Have All the Good Doctors Gone? Testing Theories of Spatial Sorting Using Medical School Rank of Medical Doctors in California (November 25, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2514847 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2514847

Stephen Popick (Contact Author)

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ( email )

550 17th Street NW
Washington, DC 20429
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
46
Abstract Views
535
PlumX Metrics