Reserve Requirement Policy Over the Business Cycle

34 Pages Posted: 27 Oct 2014

See all articles by Pablo Mariano Federico

Pablo Mariano Federico

BlackRock, Inc

Carlos A. Vegh

Johns Hopkins University - Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); University of Maryland - Department of Economics; University of California at Los Angeles; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Guillermo Vuletin

Brookings Institution

Date Written: October 2014

Abstract

Based on a novel quarterly dataset for 52 countries for the period 1970-2011, we analyze the use and cyclical properties of reserve requirements (RR) as a macroeconomic stabilization tool and whether RR policy substitutes or complements monetary policy. We find that (i) around two thirds of developing countries have used RR policy as a macroeconomic stabilization tool compared to just one third of industrial countries (and no industrial country since 2004); (ii) most developing countries that rely on RR use them countercyclically; and (iii) in many developing countries, monetary policy is procyclical and hence RR policy has substituted monetary policy as a countercyclical tool. We interpret the latter finding as reflecting the need of many emerging markets to raise interest rates in bad times to defend the currency and not raise or lower the interest rate in good times to prevent further currency appreciation. Under these circumstances, RR policy provides a second instrument that substitutes for monetary policy. Evidence from expanded Taylor rules (i.e., Taylor rules that include a nominal exchange rate target) supports these mechanisms.

Suggested Citation

Federico, Pablo Mariano and Vegh, Carlos A. and Vuletin, Guillermo, Reserve Requirement Policy Over the Business Cycle (October 2014). NBER Working Paper No. w20612, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2515190

Pablo Mariano Federico (Contact Author)

BlackRock, Inc ( email )

55 East 52nd Street
New York City, NY 10055
United States

Carlos A. Vegh

Johns Hopkins University - Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) ( email )

1740 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036-1984
United States

University of Maryland - Department of Economics ( email )

College Park, MD 20742
United States

University of California at Los Angeles ( email )

Box 951477
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1477
United States
310-825-7371 (Phone)
310-825-9528 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://vegh.sscnet.ucla.edu

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Cambridge, MA 02138
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Guillermo Vuletin

Brookings Institution ( email )

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