Legislative Veto Players and the Effects of International Human Rights Agreements

Forthcoming, American Journal of Political Science

42 Pages Posted: 31 Oct 2014

See all articles by Yonatan Lupu

Yonatan Lupu

George Washington University - Department of Political Science

Date Written: October 27, 2014

Abstract

Do national legislatures constitute a mechanism by which commitments to international human rights treaties can be made credible? Treaty ratification can activate domestic mechanisms that make repression more costly, and the legislative opposition can enhance these mechanisms. Legislative veto players raise the cost of formalistic repressive strategies by declining to consent to legislation. Executives can still choose to rely on more costly, extralegal strategies, but these could result in severe penalties for the leader and require the leader to expend resources to hide. Especially in treaty member-states, legislatures can use other powers to also increase the cost of extralegal violations, which can further reduce repression. By using an empirical strategy that attempts to address the selection effects in treaty commitment decisions, I show that positive effects of human rights treaties increase when there are more legislative veto players.

Keywords: International Law, human rights, legislatures, domestic politics

JEL Classification: K33

Suggested Citation

Lupu, Yonatan, Legislative Veto Players and the Effects of International Human Rights Agreements (October 27, 2014). Forthcoming, American Journal of Political Science. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2516349

Yonatan Lupu (Contact Author)

George Washington University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Washington, DC 20052
United States

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