Does Liking or Wanting Determine Repeat Consumption Delay?

7 Pages Posted: 31 Oct 2014

See all articles by Emily N. Garbinsky

Emily N. Garbinsky

Independent

Carey Morewedge

Boston University, Questrom School of Business

Baba Shiv

Stanford University - Stanford Graduate School of Business

Date Written: July 1, 2014

Abstract

Does liking or wanting predict the delay between consumption episodes? Although these psychological processes are correlated, we find that memory for liking, rather than wanting, determines the number of days that pass until the consumption of a food is repeated. Experiment 1 found that liking (but not wanting) for a food at the end of a consumption experience predicted how many days passed until participants wanted to consume it again. Experiment 2 showed that mitigating the decrease in liking resulting from the repeated consumption of a food eliminates its effect on delay. Together, these findings suggest that end liking has a greater influence on when people will consume a food again in the future.

Keywords: Liking, wanting, recency effects, repeat consumption delay

Suggested Citation

Garbinsky, Emily N. and Morewedge, Carey and Shiv, Baba, Does Liking or Wanting Determine Repeat Consumption Delay? (July 1, 2014). Appetite 72 (2014) 59-65; Stanford University Graduate School of Business Research Paper No. 14-43; Boston U. School of Management Research Paper No. 2516528. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2516528

Emily N. Garbinsky (Contact Author)

Independent

No Address Available

Carey Morewedge

Boston University, Questrom School of Business ( email )

595 Commonwealth Ave
614, Marketing Department
Boston, MA 02215
United States

HOME PAGE: http://careymorewedge.com

Baba Shiv

Stanford University - Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

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