Friday the 13th: The Empirics of Bad Luck

12 Pages Posted: 4 Nov 2014  

Jan Fidrmuc

Brunel University - Department of Economics and Finance; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - The William Davidson Institute

J. D. Tena

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid - Department of Statistics

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Date Written: October 23, 2014

Abstract

We use the UK Labor Force survey to investigate whether the socio-economic outcomes of people born on the 13th day of the month, and of those born on Friday the 13th, differ from the outcomes of people born on more auspicious days. In many European countries, including the UK, such days are considered unlucky. We consider outcomes that are unlikely to be affected by behavioral adjustments yet which are of considerable importance to one’s quality of life: employment, earnings and marriage. We find no evidence that people born on the 13th or those born on Friday the 13th suffer any penalty that can be attributable to the inauspicious circumstances of their birth.

Keywords: superstition, employment, labor market, marriage

JEL Classification: J11, J21, J31

Suggested Citation

Fidrmuc, Jan and Tena, J. D., Friday the 13th: The Empirics of Bad Luck (October 23, 2014). CESifo Working Paper Series No. 5026. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2518923

Jan Fidrmuc (Contact Author)

Brunel University - Department of Economics and Finance ( email )

Uxbridge UB8 3PH
United Kingdom
+44 1895 266 528 (Phone)
+44 1895 269 770 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

77 Bastwick Street
London, EC1V 3PZ
United Kingdom

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - The William Davidson Institute

724 E. University Ave.
Wyly Hall
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1234
United States

J. D. Tena

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid - Department of Statistics ( email )

Madrid, 28903
Spain

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