It's Not Me, It's You: The Functioning of Wall Street During the 2008 Economic Downturn

Stringham, Edward Peter. “It’s Not Me, It’s You: The Functioning of Wall Street During the 2008 Economic Downturn.” Public Choice, Forthcoming

20 Pages Posted: 12 Nov 2014

See all articles by Edward Peter Stringham

Edward Peter Stringham

Trinity College; American Institute for Economic Research

Date Written: November 10, 2014

Abstract

Public officials have blamed Wall Street and its complex financial products for causing the 2008 economic downturn. This article addresses three popular claims saying that complex financial markets are at fault and need more regulation. It argues that even in the midst of a major economic downturn, the much-maligned mortgage-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations, credit default swaps, and unregistered hedge funds functioned almost exactly as designed. When macroeconomic conditions worsened, firms and investors that were paid to assume certain risks had to assume them. Those that opted for safer investment vehicles with more levels of private protection faced fewer problems. Although many investment vehicles lost money, one must differentiate between problems that manifested themselves in markets and problems with the market itself. Even though government policies caused many of the problems, public officials always have an incentive to point the finger at Wall Street and to argue for more regulations when their policies negatively affect markets.

Keywords: market efficiency, housing derivatives, economic theory of regulation, political business cycle

JEL Classification: E320, E630, G180, G380, H120

Suggested Citation

Stringham, Edward Peter, It's Not Me, It's You: The Functioning of Wall Street During the 2008 Economic Downturn (November 10, 2014). Stringham, Edward Peter. “It’s Not Me, It’s You: The Functioning of Wall Street During the 2008 Economic Downturn.” Public Choice, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2522519

Edward Peter Stringham (Contact Author)

Trinity College ( email )

Hartford, CT 06106
United States

American Institute for Economic Research ( email )

PO Box 1000
Great Barrington, MA 01230
United States

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