Understanding the Rapid Reduction of Undernutrition in Nepal, 2001-2011

40 Pages Posted: 7 Jan 2015  

Derek D. Headey

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

John Hoddinott

Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Students

Date Written: November 6, 2014

Abstract

South Asia has long been synonymous with unusually high rates of undernutrition. In the past decade, however, Nepal has arguably achieved the fastest recorded decline in child stunting in the world and has done so in the midst of civil war and postconflict political instability. Given recent interest in reducing undernutrition – particularly the role of nutrition-sensitive policies – this paper aims to quantitatively understand this surprising success story by analyzing the 2001, 2006, and 2011 rounds of Nepal’s Demographic Health Surveys. To do so, the authors first construct and test basic models of the intermediate determinants of child and maternal nutritional change and then decompose predicted changes in nutrition outcomes over time. They identify four broad drivers of change: asset accumulation, health and nutrition interventions, maternal educational gains, and improvements in sanitation. Many of these changes were clearly influenced by policy decisions, including increased public investments in health and education and community-led health and sanitation campaigns. Other factors, such as rapid growth in migration-based remittances, are more a reflection of household responses to changing political and economic circumstances.

Keywords: Nepal, South Asia, Asia, Nutrition, Children, Economic Growth, Hygiene, Sanitation, Health Services, Education, Malnutrition, Stunting

Suggested Citation

Headey, Derek D. and Hoddinott, John, Understanding the Rapid Reduction of Undernutrition in Nepal, 2001-2011 (November 6, 2014). IFPRI Discussion Paper 01384. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2523597

Derek D. Headey (Contact Author)

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

2033 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006
United States

John Hoddinott

Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Students ( email )

Ithaca, NY
United States

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