Misinformation Effect in Older versus Younger Adults: A Meta-Analysis and Review

Chapter 2 IN: The Elderly Eyewitness in Court, UK: Psychology Press, 2014

UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2014-66

30 Pages Posted: 25 Nov 2014

See all articles by Lindsey E. Wylie

Lindsey E. Wylie

University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Lawrence Patihis

University of Southern Mississippi

Leslie McCuller

University of Nebraska at Lincoln - Department of Psychology

Deborah Davis

University of Nevada, Reno

Eve Brank

Law-Psychology Program, Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska

Elizabeth F. Loftus

University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior; University of California, Irvine School of Law

Brian Bornstein

University of Nebraska at Lincoln - Department of Psychology

Date Written: November 24, 2014

Abstract

This chapter reports the results of a meta-analysis which revealed that older adults are more susceptible to memory distortion following misleading information compared with young adults. The older the older adults were, the larger the effect (compared with young adults). We recommended some interview techniques that could reduce memory distortion in older adults, such as the Cognitive Interview, source-monitoring questions, encouraging effortful thinking.

Suggested Citation

Wylie, Lindsey E. and Patihis, Lawrence and McCuller, Leslie and Davis, Deborah and Brank, Eve and Loftus, Elizabeth F. and Bornstein, Brian, Misinformation Effect in Older versus Younger Adults: A Meta-Analysis and Review (November 24, 2014). Chapter 2 IN: The Elderly Eyewitness in Court, UK: Psychology Press, 2014; UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2014-66. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2530209

Lindsey E. Wylie

University of Nebraska at Lincoln ( email )

Lincoln, NE 68588
United States

Lawrence Patihis

University of Southern Mississippi ( email )

Hattiesburg, MS 39406
United States

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.usm.edu/psychology/faculty/lawrence-patihis

Leslie McCuller

University of Nebraska at Lincoln - Department of Psychology ( email )

Lincoln, NE
United States

Deborah Davis

University of Nevada, Reno ( email )

Reno, NV 89557
United States

Eve Brank

Law-Psychology Program, Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska ( email )

238 Burnett Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588
United States

Elizabeth F. Loftus (Contact Author)

University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior ( email )

4201 Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, CA 92697-7085
United States

University of California, Irvine School of Law

401 E. Peltason Dr.
Ste. 1000
Irvine, CA 92697-1000
United States

Brian Bornstein

University of Nebraska at Lincoln - Department of Psychology ( email )

238 Burnett Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588
United States
402-472-3743 (Phone)
402-472-4637 (Fax)

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