Measuring Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Mozambique

In book: Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Africa, Chapter: Measuring Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Mozambique, Publisher: Washington DC, World Bank, Editors: K. Anderson, W. Masters, 2009

Posted: 26 Nov 2014

See all articles by Channing Arndt

Channing Arndt

United Nations - World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU/WIDER)

X. Cirera

Institute of Development Studies; World Bank

Date Written: 2007

Abstract

First paragraph of Chapter: In recent decades, Mozambique has undergone enormous political and economic transformations. Once a colony of Portugal, the country moved to a phase of socialism after gaining independence in 1975, and then from 1986 the government initiated a program of economic reform aimed at establishing a market economy. Mozambique suffered from more than a decade of armed conflict, however, which together with other socioeconomic changes caused production to continue declining during much of the period to the end of civil war in 1992. Since then, a combination of peace, political stability, economic reform, and large aid flows has helped the country move from being the poorest nation in the world to achieving the highest growth rates in the region. Poverty rates have been significantly reduced and agricultural incomes have increased.

Suggested Citation

Arndt, Channing and Cirera, Xavier, Measuring Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Mozambique (2007). In book: Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Africa, Chapter: Measuring Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Mozambique, Publisher: Washington DC, World Bank, Editors: K. Anderson, W. Masters, 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2530871

Channing Arndt (Contact Author)

United Nations - World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU/WIDER) ( email )

Katajanokanlaituri 6 B
Helsinki, FI‐00160
Finland

Xavier Cirera

Institute of Development Studies ( email )

University of Sussex
Falmer, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9RE
United Kingdom

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

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