A Few Pragmatic Observations on How BITs Should Be Modified to Incorporate Human Rights Obligations

Transnational Dispute Management Special Issue: Reform of Investor-State Dispute Settlement: In Search of A Roadmap (2014)

20 Pages Posted: 28 Nov 2014 Last revised: 6 Feb 2015

See all articles by Patrick Dumberry

Patrick Dumberry

University of Ottawa - Civil Law Section

Gabrielle Dumas-Aubin

University of Ottawa - Faculty of Law

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

English Abstract: The present article examines concretely how BITs could be drafted (and existing ones be amended) to incorporate “non-investment” obligations, including human rights obligations. Very few BITs refer to questions related to human rights. When they do, they clearly do not impose any binding obligations on foreign corporations. As a result, human rights concerns can only be raised in a very limited number of circumstances before arbitral tribunals in the context of BIT arbitration proceedings. There are several features, typically found in the vast majority of BITs, that clearly bar host countries from initiating arbitration proceedings to claim reparation for human rights violations committed by a foreign investor in their territory. Thus, under the vast majority of BITs, arbitral tribunals only have jurisdiction to adjudicate claims brought by investors, and not those submitted by the host country. The present article argues that new provisions should be incorporated in BITs to impose direct human rights and other non-investment obligations upon corporations. There is indeed a need for a greater degree of balance in BITs between the legitimate interests of investors and host countries.

French Abstract: Le présent article examine concrètement comment les TBIs pourraient être rédigées (et ceux qui existent déjà pourraient être modifiés) afin d’incorporer des obligations non-investissement, y compris des obligations relatives aux humains. Très peu de TBIs renvoient à des questions liées aux droits humains. Quand ils le font, ils n’imposent aucune obligation contraignante pour les sociétés étrangères. En conséquence, les préoccupations relatives aux droits humains ne peuvent être soulevées que dans un nombre très limité de circonstances dans le cadre d'une procédure d'arbitrage . Il y a plusieurs caractéristiques, retrouvées dans la grande majorité des TBIs, qui empêchent clairement les pays d'accueil d'engager une procédure d'arbitrage pour demander réparation pour les violations des droits humains commises par un investisseur étranger sur leur territoire. Ainsi, dans la grande majorité des TBIs, les tribunaux arbitraux n'ont juridiction que pour statuer sur les revendications apportées par les investisseurs, et non celles présentées par le pays hôte. Le présent article fait valoir que de nouvelles dispositions devraient être incorporées dans les TBIs afin d'imposer des exigences en matière de droits humains ainsi que d'autres obligations non-investissement sur les sociétés. Il y a une véritable nécessité pour un plus grand équilibre dans les TBI entre les intérêts légitimes des investisseurs et ceux des pays d'accueil.

Keywords: bilateral investment treaty, human rights, corporations

Suggested Citation

Dumberry, Patrick and Dumas-Aubin, Gabrielle, A Few Pragmatic Observations on How BITs Should Be Modified to Incorporate Human Rights Obligations (2014). Transnational Dispute Management Special Issue: Reform of Investor-State Dispute Settlement: In Search of A Roadmap (2014). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2531084

Patrick Dumberry (Contact Author)

University of Ottawa - Civil Law Section ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Dr
Ottawa
Canada

HOME PAGE: http://www.droitcivil.uottawa.ca/index.php?option=com_contact&task=view&contact_id=148&Itemid=118

Gabrielle Dumas-Aubin

University of Ottawa - Faculty of Law ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5
Canada

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
136
Abstract Views
1,002
rank
213,586
PlumX Metrics