The Social Consequences of Housing

31 Pages Posted: 17 Dec 2000 Last revised: 5 Oct 2001

See all articles by Edward L. Glaeser

Edward L. Glaeser

Harvard University - Department of Economics; Brookings Institution; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Bruce Sacerdote

Dartmouth College - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: December 2000

Abstract

The social capital literature documents a connection between social connection and economic outcomes of interest ranging from government quality to economic growth. Popular authors suggest that housing and architecture are important determinants of social connection. This paper examines the connection between housing structure and social connection. We find that residents of large apartment buildings are more likely to be socially connected with their neighbors, perhaps because the distance between neighbors is lower in apartment buildings. Apartment residents are less involved in local politics, presumably because they are less connected with the public infrastructure and space that surrounds them. Street crime (robbery, auto theft) is also more common around big apartment buildings and we believe that this also occurs because of there is less connection between people in apartments and the streets that surround them.

Suggested Citation

Glaeser, Edward L. and Sacerdote, Bruce, The Social Consequences of Housing (December 2000). NBER Working Paper No. w8034. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=253142

Edward L. Glaeser (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )

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Bruce Sacerdote

Dartmouth College - Department of Economics ( email )

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