Self-Defence, Protection of Humanitarian Values and the Doctrine of Impartiality and Neutrality in Enforcement Mandates

Marc Weller (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Use of Force in International law (OUP 2015)

24 Pages Posted: 16 Dec 2014  

Nicholas Tsagourias

University of Sheffield - Faculty of Law

Date Written: December 14, 2014

Abstract

This chapter examines the scope of the principles of consent, neutrality/impartiality, and minimum use of force as they apply to modern United Nations peacekeeping operations. It asks how the use of force can be used to protect humanitarian values assigned to peacekeeping operations, and how such use of force interacts with the principles of neutrality and impartiality. The chapter also discusses the implications of ‘the responsibility to protect’ and the ‘protection of civilians’ for the competence to use force. It concludes by identifying a number of difficulties encountered by peacekeeping missions in attaining humanitarian values.

Keywords: Consent, neutrality, impartiality, use of force, United Nations, peacekeeping operations, self-defence, responsibility to protect, protection of civilians

Suggested Citation

Tsagourias, Nicholas, Self-Defence, Protection of Humanitarian Values and the Doctrine of Impartiality and Neutrality in Enforcement Mandates (December 14, 2014). Marc Weller (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Use of Force in International law (OUP 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2538194

Nicholas Tsagourias (Contact Author)

University of Sheffield - Faculty of Law ( email )

Crookesmoor Building, Conduit Road
Sheffield S10 1FL
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.shef.ac.uk/law/staff/academic/ntsagourias

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