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Equity Crowdfunding: A Market for Lemons?

48 Pages Posted: 19 Dec 2014 Last revised: 12 Jan 2016

Darian M. Ibrahim

William & Mary Law School

Date Written: March 17, 2015

Abstract

Angel investors and venture capitalists (VCs) have funded Google, Facebook, and virtually every technological success of the last thirty years. These investors operate in tight geographic networks which mitigates uncertainty, information asymmetry, and agency costs both pre- and post-investment. It follows, then, that a major concern with equity crowdfunding is that the very thing touted about it – the democratization of investing through the Internet – also eliminates the tight knit geographic communities that have made angels and VCs successful.

Despite this foundational concern, entrepreneurial finance’s move to cyberspace is inevitable. This Article examines online investing both descriptively and normatively by tackling Titles II and III of the JOBS Act of 2012 in turn. Title II allows startups to generally solicit accredited investors for the first time; Title III will allow for full-blown equity crowdfunding to unaccredited investors when implemented.

I first show that Title II is proving successful because it more closely resembles traditional angel investing than some new paradigm of entrepreneurial finance. Title II platforms are simply taking advantage of the Internet to reduce the transaction costs of traditional angel operations and add passive angels to their networks at a low cost.

Title III, on the other hand, will represent a true equity crowdfunding situation and thus a paradigm shift in entrepreneurial finance. Despite initial concerns that only low-quality startups and investors will use Title III, I argue that there are good reasons why Title III could attract high-quality participants as well. The key question will be whether high-quality startups can signal themselves as such to avoid the classic “lemons” problem. I contend that harnessing the wisdom of crowds and redefining Title III”s “funding portals” to serve as reputational intermediaries are two ways to avoid the lemons problem.

Keywords: crowdfunding, startups, JOBS Act, angel investors, venture capitalists, AngelList, FundersClub, entrepreneurial finance

Suggested Citation

Ibrahim, Darian M., Equity Crowdfunding: A Market for Lemons? (March 17, 2015). Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 100 (2015); William & Mary Law School Research Paper No. 09-292. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2539786 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2539786

Darian M. Ibrahim (Contact Author)

William & Mary Law School ( email )

South Henry Street
P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
United States

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