Some Notes on the Topography of Eastern Pontos Euxeinos in Late Antiquity and Early Byzantium

21 Pages Posted: 30 Dec 2014

See all articles by Andrey Vinogradov

Andrey Vinogradov

National Research University Higher School of Economics

Date Written: December 29, 2014

Abstract

This paper clarifies some issues of late antique and early Byzantine topography of Eastern Pontos Euxeinos. These questions can be divided into two large groups: the ecclesiastical topography and the locations of Byzantine fortresses. The earliest testimony of Apostolic preaching on the Eastern black sea coast — the list of the apostles by Pseudo-Epiphanius — following the ‘Chronicon’ of Hyppolitus of Rome, unsuccessfully connects South-Eastern Pontos Euxeinos to Sebastopolis the Great (modern Sukhumi), which subsequently gives rise to an itinerary of the apostle Andrew. The Early Byzantine Church in the region had a complicated arrangement: the Zekchians, Abasgians and possibly Apsilians had their own bishoprics (later archbishoprics); the Lazicans had a metropolitan in Phasis (and not in their capital Archaeopolis) with five bishop-suffragans. Byzantine fortresses, mentioned in 7th c sources, are located mostly in Apsilia and Missimiania, in the Kodori valley, which had strategic importance as a route from the Black sea to the North Caucasus.

Keywords: Caucasus, Byzantium, topography, Church, fortresses

JEL Classification: Z12

Suggested Citation

Vinogradov, Andrey, Some Notes on the Topography of Eastern Pontos Euxeinos in Late Antiquity and Early Byzantium (December 29, 2014). Higher School of Economics Research Paper No. WP BRP 82/HUM/2014 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2543458 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2543458

Andrey Vinogradov (Contact Author)

National Research University Higher School of Economics ( email )

Myasnitskaya street, 20
Moscow, Moscow 119017
Russia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
35
Abstract Views
382
PlumX