Piloting Risk-Informed Interference Assessment Using Waivers

14 Pages Posted: 30 Dec 2014 Last revised: 19 Mar 2015

See all articles by Tyler Cox

Tyler Cox

University of Colorado Law School

Stephanie Minnock

Independent

Jean Pierre De Vries

University of Colorado at Boulder Law School - Silicon Flatirons Center

Date Written: March 13, 2015

Abstract

This working paper investigates whether there are Federal Communications Commission actions that would be well suited to serve as pilots of risk-informed interference assessment (“RIIA”). It investigates the record of petitions for spectrum-related waivers, experimental licenses and special temporary authority over the last five years.

It concludes that waivers — rulings by the FCC that excuse compliance, in whole or part, with its rules following a petition by a licensee — seem to be the well suited for RIIA pilots because they are narrower than larger-scale rulemakings, reducing the risk of unexpected adverse impacts. We expect that waivers will accommodate RIIA with minimal disruption to the existing process. Site-specific waivers may be best suited for initial trials because they involve a smaller number variables than nationwide or device waivers.

Keywords: Federal Communications Commission, FCC, risk-informed, interference, spectrum, wireless, Silicon Flatirons

Suggested Citation

Cox, Tyler and Minnock, Stephanie and De Vries, Jean Pierre, Piloting Risk-Informed Interference Assessment Using Waivers (March 13, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2543632 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2543632

Tyler Cox (Contact Author)

University of Colorado Law School ( email )

401 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

Stephanie Minnock

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Jean Pierre De Vries

University of Colorado at Boulder Law School - Silicon Flatirons Center ( email )

1070 Edinboro Drive
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

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