Trauma and Stigma: The Long-Term Effects of Wartime Violence on Political Attitudes

42 Pages Posted: 31 Dec 2014 Last revised: 14 Aug 2015

See all articles by Jean Hong

Jean Hong

University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

Woo Chang Kang

Department of Politics and International Relations

Date Written: July 15, 2015

Abstract

How does wartime violence affect public attitudes toward the government in the long run? In this paper, we examine whether violence against civilians during the Korean War continues to influence people’s attitudes toward the South Korean government more than half a century later. We find that wartime violence has clear long-term attitudinal effects. Using a difference-in-differences (DID) analysis that compares the cohorts born before and after the war, the findings indicate that people who experienced violence in their childhood (0- 5 years) are less supportive of the South Korean government, especially the administration and the military, compared to those born in the same areas during the 5 years after the war. We argue that the gap between pre- and post-war cohorts is generated by the long-lasting trauma of wartime violence and the social stigma imposed on violence victims after the war.

Suggested Citation

Hong, Ji Yeon and Kang, Woo Chang, Trauma and Stigma: The Long-Term Effects of Wartime Violence on Political Attitudes (July 15, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2543756 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2543756

Ji Yeon Hong

University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong) ( email )

Hong Kong

Woo Chang Kang (Contact Author)

Department of Politics and International Relations ( email )

1 Anam-dong 5 ka
Seoul
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
60
Abstract Views
672
rank
387,621
PlumX Metrics