Social Citizenship, Housing Wealth and the Cost of Social Care: Is the Care Act 2014 ‘Fair'?

28 Pages Posted: 3 Jan 2015

See all articles by Nicholas (Nick) P. Hopkins

Nicholas (Nick) P. Hopkins

University of Southampton - School of Law

Emma Laurie

University of Southampton - School of Law

Date Written: January 2015

Abstract

This article assesses the extent to which it is ‘fair’ for the government to require owner‐occupiers to draw on the equity accumulated in their home to fund their social care costs. The question is stimulated by the report of the Commission on Funding of Care and Support, Fairer Care Funding (the Dilnot Commission) and the subsequent Care Act 2014. The enquiry is located within the framework of social citizenship and the new social contract. It argues that the individualistic, contractarian approach, exemplified by the Dilnot Commission and reflected in the Act, raises questions when considered from the perspective of intergenerational fairness. We argue that our concerns with the Act could be addressed by inculcating an expectation of drawing on housing wealth to fund older age: a policy of asset‐based welfare.

Keywords: Social care funding, Care Act 2014, social citizenship, asset‐based welfare, intergenerational fairness

Suggested Citation

Hopkins, Nicholas (Nick) P. and Laurie, Emma, Social Citizenship, Housing Wealth and the Cost of Social Care: Is the Care Act 2014 ‘Fair'? (January 2015). The Modern Law Review, Vol. 78, Issue 1, pp. 112-139, 2015, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2544758 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-2230.12108

Nicholas (Nick) P. Hopkins (Contact Author)

University of Southampton - School of Law ( email )

Southampton SO17 1BJ
United Kingdom

Emma Laurie

University of Southampton - School of Law ( email )

Southampton SO17 1BJ
United Kingdom

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