Income-Based Inequality in Educational Outcomes: Learning from State Longitudinal Data Systems

44 Pages Posted: 12 Jan 2015

See all articles by John P. Papay

John P. Papay

Brown University

Richard J. Murnane

Harvard University - Harvard Graduate School of Education; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

John B. Willett

Harvard University - Harvard Graduate School of Education

Date Written: December 2014

Abstract

We report results from our long-standing research partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. We make two primary contributions. First, we illustrate the wide range of informative analyses that can be conducted using a state longitudinal data system and the advantages of examining evidence from multiple cohorts of students. Second, we document large income-based gaps in educational attainments, including high-school graduation rates and college-going. Importantly, we show that income-related gaps in both educational credentials and academic skill have narrowed substantially over the past several years in Massachusetts.

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Suggested Citation

Papay, John P. and Murnane, Richard J. and Willett, John B., Income-Based Inequality in Educational Outcomes: Learning from State Longitudinal Data Systems (December 2014). NBER Working Paper No. w20802, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2548339

John P. Papay (Contact Author)

Brown University ( email )

Box 1860
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United States

Richard J. Murnane

Harvard University - Harvard Graduate School of Education ( email )

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Cambridge, MA 02138
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617-496-4820 (Phone)
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

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617-496-4820 (Phone)
617-496-3095 (Fax)

John B. Willett

Harvard University - Harvard Graduate School of Education ( email )

6 Appian Way
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-495-3401 (Phone)

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