Constitutional Avoidance in Social Rights Adjudication

19 Pages Posted: 20 Jan 2015 Last revised: 14 Feb 2018

Farrah Ahmed

The University of Melbourne - Law School

Tarunabh Khaitan

University of Oxford - Faculty of Law; University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law Study Group; The University of Melbourne - Law School

Date Written: January 19, 2015

Abstract

In Judging Social Rights, Jeff King makes a powerful case for a limited, incrementalist, judicial approach to social rights adjudication. We argue that while King’s presciptions are justified, he is too cautious about the applicability of his incrementalist prescriptions to legal systems that suffer systemic administrative inefficiencies. Using the Indian experience as a case study, we show that such caution is misplaced, and that at least one of King’s incrementalist strategies, constitutional avoidance, has particular salience for such jurisdictions.

Keywords: Social Rights, Socio-Economic Rights, Constitutional Avoidance, Administrative Law, Jeff King, Structural Remedies, Adjudication, Social Rights in India, incrementalism

Suggested Citation

Ahmed, Farrah and Khaitan, Tarunabh, Constitutional Avoidance in Social Rights Adjudication (January 19, 2015). 35(3) Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 607-625, Autumn 2015; Oxford Legal Studies Research Paper No. 6/2015; U of Melbourne Legal Studies Research Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2551831

Farrah Ahmed (Contact Author)

The University of Melbourne - Law School ( email )

University Square
185 Pelham Street, Carlton
Victoria, Victoria 3010
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.unimelb.edu.au/melbourne-law-school/community/our-staff/staff-profile/username/Farrah

Tarunabh Khaitan

University of Oxford - Faculty of Law ( email )

St. Cross Building
St. Cross Road
Oxford, OX1 3UJ
United Kingdom

University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law Study Group

Boalt Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States

The University of Melbourne - Law School ( email )

University Square
185 Pelham Street, Carlton
Victoria, Victoria 3010
Australia

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