Vital Dimensions in Volume Perception: Can the Eye Fool the Stomach?

Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 36, No. 3, (Aug., 1999), pp. 313-326

15 Pages Posted: 21 Jan 2015

See all articles by Priya Raghubir

Priya Raghubir

University of California, Berkeley - Marketing Group

Aradhna Krishna

University of Michigan, Stephen M. Ross School of Business

Date Written: January 19, 2015

Abstract

Given the number of volume judgments made by consumers, for example, deciding which package is larger and by how much, it is surprising that little research pertaining to volume perceptions has been done in marketing. In this article, the authors examine the interplay of expectations based on perceptual inputs versus experiences based on sensory input in the context of volume perceptions. Specifically, they examine biases in the perception of volume due to container shape. The height of the container emerges as a vital dimension that consumers appear to use as a simplifying visual heuristic to make a volume judgment. However, perceived consumption, contrary to perceived volume, is related inversely to height. This lowered perceived consumption is hypothesized and shown to increase actual consumption. A series of seven laboratory experiments programmatically test model predictions. Results show that perceived volume, perceived consumption, and actual consumption are related sequentially. Furthermore, the authors show that container shape affects preference, choice, and post-consumption satisfaction. The authors discuss theoretical implications for contrast effects when expectancies are is confirmed, specifically as they relate to biases in visual information processing, and provide managerial implications of the results for package design, communication, and pricing.

Suggested Citation

Raghubir, Priya and Krishna, Aradhna, Vital Dimensions in Volume Perception: Can the Eye Fool the Stomach? (January 19, 2015). Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 36, No. 3, (Aug., 1999), pp. 313-326. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2552246

Priya Raghubir

University of California, Berkeley - Marketing Group ( email )

Haas School of Business
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States
510-643-1899 (Phone)
510-643-1420 (Fax)

Aradhna Krishna (Contact Author)

University of Michigan, Stephen M. Ross School of Business ( email )

701 Tappan Street
Ann Arbor, MI MI 48109
United States

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