Civil Society and Environmental Protection: The Case of Jamaica

15 Penn St. Envtl. L. Rev. 1 (2006-2007)

29 Pages Posted: 25 Jan 2015

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

The article examines the problems of environmental protection in developing countries, using the island nation of Jamaica as a case study. Solid waste management and water pollution are perhaps the most pressing issues, but problems of social organization and financial resources are perhaps equally important.

Jamaica has tried to respond, with the meager resources at its disposal by engaging civil society. This approach focuses primarily on nongovernmental organizations, which assist in setting and implementing policy, as well as in seeking funds from international donors.

Part of the traditional role of the nongovernmental organization is to stand between the government and the people, keeping the former accountable to the latter, however. Thus, the Jamaican strategy of necessity creates some civic and political tension.

Suggested Citation

McDougall, Harold A., Civil Society and Environmental Protection: The Case of Jamaica (2006). 15 Penn St. Envtl. L. Rev. 1 (2006-2007). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2554836

Harold A. McDougall (Contact Author)

Howard University School of Law ( email )

2900 Van Ness Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20008
United States

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