Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives

109 Pages Posted: 1 Feb 2015 Last revised: 20 Dec 2015

See all articles by Karletta Chief

Karletta Chief

University of Arizona

Ann Marie Chischilly

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals

Patricia Cochran

Alaska Native Science Commission

Mike Durglo

Salish Kootenai College

Preston Hardison

Tulalip Tribes

Joe Hostler

Yurok Tribe

Kathy Lynn

University of Oregon

Gary Morishima

Quinault Management Center

Don Motanic

Intertribal Timber Council

Jim St. Arnold

Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission

Carson Viles

University of Oregon

Garrit Voggesser

National Wildlife Federation

Kyle Whyte

University of Michigan

Dan Wildcat

Haskell Indian Nations University

Sue Wotkyns

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals

Date Written: January 25, 2015

Abstract

Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges (TKs) in Climate Change Initiatives is a publication intended to be an informational resource for tribes, agencies, and organizations across the United States interested in understanding TKs in the context of climate change. The Third National Climate Assessment issued in May 2014 contained a chapter dedicated to the impact of climate change on tribal peoples. In light of the increasing recognition of the significance of traditional knowledges (TKs) in relation to climate change, a self-organized, informal group of indigenous persons, staff of indigenous governments and organizations, and experts with experience working with issues concerning traditional knowledges (The Climate and Traditional Knowledges Workgroup – CTKW), felt compelled to develop a framework to increase understanding of issues relating to access and protection of TKs in climate initiatives and interactions between holders of TKs and non-tribal partners. The Guidelines were originally developed to inform the Department of Interior’s Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science (ACCCNRS) in May 2014.

Keywords: Traditional ecological knowledge, Indigenous knowledge, knowledge exchange, Native science

Suggested Citation

Chief, Karletta and Chischilly, Ann Marie and Cochran, Patricia and Durglo, Mike and Hardison, Preston and Hostler, Joe and Lynn, Kathy and Morishima, Gary and Motanic, Don and St. Arnold, Jim and Viles, Carson and Voggesser, Garrit and Whyte, Kyle and Wildcat, Dan and Wotkyns, Sue, Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives (January 25, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2555299 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2555299

Karletta Chief

University of Arizona ( email )

Department of History
Tucson, AZ 85721
United States

Ann Marie Chischilly

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals ( email )

Patricia Cochran

Alaska Native Science Commission ( email )

Mike Durglo

Salish Kootenai College ( email )

Pablo, MT
United States

Preston Hardison

Tulalip Tribes ( email )

The Tulalip Tribes of Washington
6406 Marine Dr
Tulalip, WA 98271
United States

Joe Hostler

Yurok Tribe ( email )

Kathy Lynn

University of Oregon ( email )

1280 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States

Gary Morishima

Quinault Management Center ( email )

11900 NE 1st St, Suite 3106
Bellevue, WA 98005
United States
425.214.7430 (Phone)

Don Motanic

Intertribal Timber Council ( email )

Jim St. Arnold

Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission ( email )

Carson Viles

University of Oregon ( email )

1280 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States

Garrit Voggesser

National Wildlife Federation ( email )

Kyle Whyte (Contact Author)

University of Michigan ( email )

440 Church Street
Dana Building
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States

Dan Wildcat

Haskell Indian Nations University ( email )

Sue Wotkyns

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals ( email )

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